Question: Which Is The Best Definition Of Metonymy?

What is the purpose of metonymy?

The purpose of a metonymy is generally to focus the rhetorical emphasis of a reference to an object on a specific quality of that object..

What is difference between metonymy and synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech referring to when a part of something is used to refer to the whole, such as in the phrase “all hands on deck,” where “hands” are people. … ‘Synecdoche’ is when a part of something is used to refer to the whole. ‘Metonymy’ is when something is used to represent something related to it.

How can I remember metonymy?

An easy way to remember metonymy is that the prefix ‘meto-‘ means change, and the suffix ‘-onymy’ means a name/word or set of names/words. In simpler words, you could say that Metonymy is ‘using a single feature to represent the whole’.

What is metonymy in figures of speech?

Metonymy comes from the Greek word “metōnymía,” which translates to “change of name.” Metonymy is a figure of speech in which an object or idea is referred to by the name of something closely associated with it, as opposed to by its own name.

Is lend me your ears synecdoche or metonymy?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech where a part of something is used for the whole or vice versa. Therefore lend me your ears is a synecdoche because in lending the ears the person is using part of the body to give the person making the statement his/her full attention.

What is an example of synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which, most often, a part of something is used to refer to its whole. For example, “The captain commands one hundred sails” is a synecdoche that uses “sails” to refer to ships—ships being the thing of which a sail is a part.

How do you use metonymy in a sentence?

The name, arising from this unusual sound, has been by metonymy translated into ” God’s Voice.” AEON, a term often used in Greek (aion) to denote an indefinite or infinite duration of time; and hence, by metonymy, a being that exists for ever.

What is the most common form of metonymy?

A common form of metonymy uses a place to stand in for an institution, industry, or person. “Wall Street” is an example of this, as is “the White House” to mean the President or Presidential administration of the United States, or “Hollywood” to mean the American film industry.

What is the difference between metaphor and metonymy?

Metaphor and metonymy are similar in various aspects but the major difference is that if a metaphor substitutes a concept with another, a metonymy selects a related term. … So metonymy is a figure of speech. It is used in rhetoric where a thing is not referred by its name but with the associated word.

What is an example of a chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.

How would you define metonymy?

: a figure of speech consisting of the use of the name of one thing for that of another of which it is an attribute or with which it is associated (such as “crown” in “lands belonging to the crown”)

Which is the best example of synecdoche?

Forms of SynecdocheThe word “sails” is often used to refer to a whole ship.The phrase “hired hands” can be used to refer to workers.The word “head” can refer to counting cattle or people.The word “bread” can be used to represent food in general or money (e.g. he is the breadwinner; music is my bread and butter).More items…

How do you write a metonymy?

In order to write a metonymy,Examine a sentence for a phrase which can be shortened or replaced with a defining characteristic or associated idea.Replace the phrase with the metonymic phrase.

What is a metonymy example?

Metonymy is the use of a linked term to stand in for an object or concept. … Sometimes metonymy is chosen because it’s a well-known characteristic of the concept. A famous example is, “The pen is mightier than the sword,” from Edward Bulwer Lytton’s play Richelieu.

Is lend me your ears metonymy?

A familiar Shakespearean example is Mark Antony’s speech in Julius Caesar in which he asks of his audience: “Lend me your ears.” Metonymy is closely related to synecdoche, the naming of a part for the whole or a whole for the part, and is a common poetic device.